Computer Imaging Technology Creates X-Ray Videos: Rotoscoping
Above: X-ray of a dog’s skeleton.
[[MORE]]

Imagine being able to see inside an animal and watch its bones move.  Imagine if scientists had a better way to study moving skeletons and doctors had a better way to diagnose and study skeletal injuries.  This capability may no longer be out of reach.  Stephen Gatesy and David Baier, NSF-funded researchers at Brown University, have developed a method of clearly observing the movement of skeletons of living animals.



Using a novel technique called scientific rotoscoping, the researchers simultaneously record standard video of moving animals and X-ray images of their moving skeletons. From these images an animated 3-D computer model of the moving skeleton overlaid on the digital recording of the moving animal can be used to study coordinated skeletal movement with animal movement for the first time.

Source: X-Ray Vision: Science fiction to Science Fact
Photo Credit: Jupiterimages Corporation

Computer Imaging Technology Creates X-Ray Videos: Rotoscoping

Above: X-ray of a dog’s skeleton.

Imagine being able to see inside an animal and watch its bones move.  Imagine if scientists had a better way to study moving skeletons and doctors had a better way to diagnose and study skeletal injuries.  This capability may no longer be out of reach.  Stephen Gatesy and David Baier, NSF-funded researchers at Brown University, have developed a method of clearly observing the movement of skeletons of living animals.

Using a novel technique called scientific rotoscoping, the researchers simultaneously record standard video of moving animals and X-ray images of their moving skeletons. From these images an animated 3-D computer model of the moving skeleton overlaid on the digital recording of the moving animal can be used to study coordinated skeletal movement with animal movement for the first time.

Source: X-Ray Vision: Science fiction to Science Fact

Photo Credit: Jupiterimages Corporation